Rochester Subway
Subscribe for Email UpdatesBecome a Facebook FanFollow Us on TwitterRSS Feed Rochester History + New Ideas. Fresh from the Rochester Subway.

Topics


Rochester Subway Gift Shop


¤ Visit the Gift Shop
¤ See Combo Deals & Offers


Modern Rochester Subway Map

Modern Rochester Subway Map

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Rochester Neighborhoods Map

Rochester Neighborhoods Map

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Rochester Subway Map, 1928

1928 Rochester Subway Map

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Rochester Subway DVD

The End of the Line - Rochester’s Subway (DVD)

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Rochester Landmarks Poster

Rochester Landmarks Poster

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Original Streetart by SPACEMAN

Original Streetart by SPACEMAN

¤ View All Spaceman Art


Old Rochester Photos<br>and Historical Views

Old Rochester Photos
and Historical Views

(Framed Reprints Available)

¤ View All Rochester Photos


Rochester Subway Cap

Embroidered Subway Cap

¤ View Details


Rochester Subway T-Shirt

Rochester Subway T-Shirt

¤ View Details


Rochester Subway Token T-Shirt

RTC Token T-Shirt

¤ View Details


Rochester RTC Token

RTC Token (1948)

¤ View Details

 | 

SOLD OUT


Roch. & Brighton Token

Roch. & Brighton Token
(1887-90)

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Rochester Railway Co. Token

Rochester Railway Co. Token (1900-09)

¤ View Details

 | 

SOLD OUT


Rochester School Fare Token

School Fare Token (1948)

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Rochester NYS Railways Token

NYS Railways Token (1909-38)

¤ View Details

 | 

Add To Cart


Rochester Subway Poster + DVD Combo

Rochester Subway
Poster + DVD Combo

¤ 

Add To Cart

 (Save 10%)


Rochester Subway Vintage Postcard

Vintage Postcard (1941),
Rochester Rail Equipment

¤ View Details

 | 

Order Reprint

¤ See All Vintage Postcards


Rochester Subway Vintage Postcard

Vintage Postcard (1938),
Subway & Broad Street

¤ View Details

 | 

Order Reprint

¤ See All Vintage Postcards


Rochester Subway Vintage Postcard

Vintage Postcard (1942),
Rochester City Hall & Subway

¤ View Details

 | 

Order Reprint

¤ See All Vintage Postcards


Rochester Subway Vintage Postcard

Vintage Postcard (c.1912),
Rochester’s Four Corners

¤ View Details

 | 

Order Reprint

¤ See All Vintage Postcards


Rochester Subway Vintage Postcard

Vintage Postcard (c.1905),
Erie Canal Aqueduct

¤ View Details

 | 

Order Reprint

¤ See All Vintage Postcards


Rochester Subway Vintage Postcard

Vintage Postcard (c.1928),
South Entrance to Subway

¤ View Details

 | 

Order Reprint

¤ See All Vintage Postcards


Rochester Subway + Trolley Transit Passes

Original Subway, Trolley,
and Bus Weekly Transit Passes

¤ View All Transit Passes





New Circulator Would Connect the Dots for Downtown Rochester

March 20th, 2011

The Circulator bus in Washington D.C. [PHOTO: afagen's Flickr Stream]

The City of Rochester has been busy busy busy. Last week we took a look at our new Bike Master Plan. This week we’ll get a chance to review and ask questions about the proposed Center City Circulator. What? You have no idea what a “circulator” is? No worries. Watch the video clip below and learn about Washington D.C.’s new-ish circulator system with Gabe Klein, Director of Washington D.C.’s Department of Transportation (DDOT).

Next, plan to attend the public meeting this Thursday (5:30p)external link to review Rochester’s circulator plan, study, whatever you call it. For extra credit you should read the study [PDF].

So what Rochester hot spots would you want to see connected with a cool, easy-to-use circulator? The East End? Museums? Four Corners? Cornhill? High Falls? The business district? It’s all in this study. But choosing a route (or routes) won’t be so easy. The planners have narrowed it down to five possible routes (see below). Each has its pros and cons (i.e. cost, complexity, service level, etc.).

OPTION 1:
ROCHESTER CIRCULATOR OPTION 1: This option provides the most coverage, connecting popular locations and parking facilities. But it's complex; requiring three separate routes. And it's the most expensive; requiring five buses to keep headways short.
This option provides the most coverage, connecting popular locations and parking facilities. But it’s complex; requiring three separate routes. And it’s the most expensive; requiring five buses to keep headways short.

OPTION 2:
ROCHESTER CIRCULATOR OPTION 2: Provides good coverage with two routes plus one additional PM route. According to the study, this option generally provides the best balance of serving commuters and visitors in both day and nighttime. This option is only slightly less expensive than option 1, requiring one less bus.
Provides good coverage with two routes plus one additional PM route. According to the study, this option generally provides the best balance of serving commuters and visitors in both day and nighttime. This option is only slightly less expensive than option 1, requiring one less bus.

OPTION 3:
ROCHESTER CIRCULATOR OPTION 3: Two lines that provide good east-west coverage along Main Street, and north-south coverage along State Street, Clinton Avenue and Monroe Avenue. These routes could convert into a nice starter streetcar line. This option would cost the same as option 2.
Two lines that provide good east-west coverage along Main Street, and north-south coverage along State Street, Clinton Avenue and Monroe Avenue. These routes could convert into a nice starter streetcar line. This option would cost the same as option 2.

OPTION 4:
ROCHESTER CIRCULATOR OPTION 4: According to the study, this option provides a system that would most likely represent the future circulator system were the RTS routes along Main Street upgraded to a fixed-guideway system. This option is estimated to cost nearly 47% less than option 1, requiring only 2 buses. However, this alignment leaves much of the west side out of the picture.
According to the study, this option provides a system that would most likely represent the future circulator system were the RTS routes along Main Street upgraded to a fixed-guideway system. This option is estimated to cost nearly 47% less than option 1, requiring only 2 buses. However, this alignment leaves much of the west side out of the picture.

OPTION 5:
ROCHESTER CIRCULATOR OPTION 5: This option may not have all the bells and whistles as 1-4, but it's simplicity might actually make it very easy to use, especially if your just visiting Rochester for the first time. Although you'd might have to walk a few blocks, it does cover much of the Center City. It's also the cheapest; nearly 70% less expensive than option 1. On the other hand, we don't want to skimp and have this project fail because we weren't willing to put the dollars into it.
This option may not have all the bells and whistles as 1-4, but it’s simplicity might actually make it very easy to use, especially if your just visiting Rochester for the first time. Although you’d might have to walk a few blocks, it does cover much of the Center City. It’s also the cheapest; nearly 70% less expensive than option 1. On the other hand, we don’t want to skimp and have this project fail because we weren’t willing to put the dollars into it.

I know I don’t have to say it, but this will be an EXTREMELY important project if the City chooses to take it on. Finally, we could have a popular and convenient way of navigating downtown. Have dinner on Park Ave, catch a game at Frontier Field, and suck down a cold one at your favorite East End pub – without ever reaching for your car keys! I don’t know about you, but chills just ran down my spine. WHOO WEE!

And this circulator will be important for whole n’other reason… If it succeeds, the study identifies a fixed-guideway system (i.e. STREETCAR/TROLLEY) as a possibility for future implementation:

…The long term aspiration is to provide a more extensive system that would connect directly to residential neighborhoods or other key demand generators. There are two aspects of such a system which have been discussed … First, there is interest in the possibility of a fixed-guideway system. This is generally envisioned as a downtown streetcar or light rail line that would stretch beyond the Inner Loop, with potential future connections to suburban locations. Rather than circulate through the downtown, it would likely bisect it linearly along Main Street, State Street or Clinton Avenue.

I swear on my favorite dead pet’s grave, I will ride this circulator everyday, twice a day, if that’s what it takes to make it a success. Let’s make sure this idea doesn’t go the way of the EZ Rider. Come to the public meeting this Thursdayexternal link ask questions, offer suggestions, and show your support.

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

This entry was posted on Sunday, March 20th, 2011 at 12:36 am and is filed under Events, Rochester News, Transit + Infrastructure, Video. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

4 Responses to “New Circulator Would Connect the Dots for Downtown Rochester”

  1. Jim says:

    Mike, help me understand this information. Can you rate the proposed configurations against all the planning criteria combined? Each approach seems to optimize one or two requirements. I’m wondering which approaches, in your opinion, provide the best tradeoffs between (for example) connectivity, integration with other (possibly future) modes of transit, expansion from a small starter system, and the likelihood of being funded? Which have the greatest potential for stimulating development? What suggestions might you have for improving the options put forth in the study?

    Also, could you offer your thoughts on why EZ Rider failed? Okay, it was an easy target when things got tight. Just wondering why it was an easy target. How can we do it better?

  2. Hi Jim! I’m not sure if I can personally rank all the options myself (yet). But I’ll see if I can boil it down for us…

    Firstly, from what I understand the EZ-Rider shuttle failed because the City decided not to reapply for the grant money to keep it operating after a relatively short trial period due to “low ridership”. It offered 2 routes geared towards visitors and tourists. Personally I think the problem with EZ-Rider may have been that it was not ambitious ENOUGH. We don’t need a bar bus. We need a transit tool that is “EZ” to use, but also extensive in its coverage (route- and schedule-wise).

    This study largely focuses on linking parking facilities at the perimeter of the Center City with destinations inside the loop. The benefits would be several:

    1. Promote economic development by easing parking concerns among future developers, tenants, and visitors to downtown
    2. Support the City’s environmental sustainability by reducing car trips within downtown – reducing traffic and emissions and generally making our streets more pleasant for pedestrians
    3. Promote tourism and improve the attractiveness of the Downtown for conventions and the like

    If money is no object Option 1 is a pretty obvious choice. It hits all the targets: east, west, north, south, perimeter parking, (future) RTS and Amtrak stations, etc. Of course, if money were no object I’d also choose modern electric streetcars instead of diesel hybrid buses…

    But money obviously IS a factor and that’s why I think Option 5 is included. If we are ranking these by how well they connect perimeter parking facilities, and we certainly are, then this option fails. It doesn’t come close enough to put me within a comfortable walking distance from lots on the west and south sides of the loop. I also don’t like that it does not serve the Amtrak/Greyhound facility. I would not make the assumption that people will be as willing to jump on an RTS bus as they might be willing to use the circulator, and so I don’t think we should rely on RTS routes as much as this option does.

    Here’s a quick look at dollars and cents:

    Option 1 Annual Cost: $2,296,700
    Option 5 Annual Cost: $731,850

    There are also capital costs associated with each option. For example, each bus could cost up to $500,000…

    Option 1, 5 buses = $2,000,000
    Option 5, 1 bus = $500,000

    Options 2-4 fall somewhere in the middle and the study stops just short of actually recommending Option 2.

    As far as which route lends itself better to a future streetcar conversion, I think it’s almost a mute point because we’re talking about bus routes in the first place, but I like the general pattern of Option 3 with it’s strong east-west spine and the branches off Clinton Avenue and State Street.

    So there it is in a nutshell as best as I understand it. But there are many questions I need to ask on Thursday. For instance, why in Option 1, is route 1a (blue) shown as TWO separate loops, one on the east side and one on the west side of the river? Why wouldn’t that be 1 continuous loop traversing the river as in Option 3?

    This is why it is SO important for us all to actually GO to the public meeting and ask questions. I can’t stress this enough!! (You can’t see me but I’m jumping up and down on my sofa)

  3. Mike says:

    I’m late to the party with this, having just discovered this site. But I am eager to hear how the circulator meeting went. Doesn’t seem that this story is being covered in the local print media.

  4. @Mike, the meeting went very well and the circulator plan was well received by those who attended. The City is focusing on options #2 and #3. But no route has been chosen yet.

    Next step is to get local decision-makers on board and explore funding options.

    We can all help by contacting our City Councilpersons, County Legislators, Mayor, and County Executive to ask their support for this regionally-significant service.

    Secondly, if you happen to be a downtown worker, getting buy-in from your corporate leadership will also be key. Please let your employer know about the circulator plan and let them know you support it.


Post a Comment...



  You May Also Like...
  Most Popular...
  1. Boy Lived in NYC Subway for 11 Days
  2. Pot Holds Bowie in Rochester
  3. Inside Rochester's Terrence Tower
  4. University of Rochester's Lost Swimming Pool
  5. Rewind: High Speed Rail Art from 2002
  6. The Old Barber House
  7. Rochester Mafia, the Banana King, and the Infamous "Barrel Murder"
  8. Rochester's 7th Most Beautiful Train Station in the U.S.
  9. RGRTA Digs Up Rochester's Old RKO Palace Theater
  10. Subway Tunnel To Be Filled. This time they mean it. Probably.
  11. A 100 Ton Discovery at the Port of Rochester
  12. 1906 Panorama and More Old Photos of Rochester, NY
  13. Rundel Library on Ghost Hunters: 'Due Date with Death'
  14. Exploring the Caves of Rochester, NY
  15. Never Before Seen Photos of RKO Palace Theater
  16. Genesee Brewery to Demolish This Building
  17. What Is This Strange Water Feature?
  18. Rochester 2020 - Rail vs. Fast Buses?
  19. Rochester's Case for a Streetcar
  20. Irondequoit Square
  21. Drunk Woman Nearly Flattened by Boston Subway Train
  22. Rochester's (inspiring) Old Railroad Stations
  23. ROC Low Line: A (new) Proposal for Rochester's Abandoned Subway
  24. A Better Bus Stop Sign for Rochester
  25. Inside the Iola Tuberculosis Sanatorium
  26. Give Me City Gate
  27. History of Seabreeze Amusement Park
  28. Inside the Pulaski Library
  29. A Tour of Rochester's Times Square Building
  30. Loving Life at Erie Harbor Apartments
  31. Does Rochester Have a Parking Problem?
  32. Fortified Rochester
  33. Imagine, Rochester's Historic Brewery Square
  34. Manhattan Square Park Mural Erased
  35. Who is Spaceman?

Topics

  • Art + Culture (64)
  • Events (61)
  • Freebies (9)
  • Interviews (29)
  • Opinion (79)
  • Reader Submitted Stories (74)
  • Rochester Destinations (54)
  • Rochester Gifts (14)
  • Rochester History (151)
  • Rochester Homes for Sale (3)
  • Rochester Images (161)
  • Rochester News (211)
  • Rochester Subway (40)
  • Rochester Subway Stories (12)
  • Subways Around the Globe (9)
  • Train/Railroad Stuff (32)
  • Transit + Infrastructure (130)
  • Urban Development (165)
  • Urban Exploration (31)

  • Rochester Subway Information

    Get Email Updates...
    Stay up-to-date on Rochester-related stories, artifacts, and ideas that you won't find in the mainstream news. Totally free, never spammy, and you can unsubscribe at any time.


    ¤ See Past Issues
    ¤ Our Privacy Policy

    Links

    Get Involved...

    ¤ Reconnect Rochester

    Related Blogs...

    ¤ A Town Square
    ¤ Moderate Urban Champ
    ¤ Our Tiny Earth
    ¤ The Rochesterian
    ¤ RocVille
    ¤ Rust Wire

    Resources...

    ¤ RochesterDowntown.com
    ¤ Rochester's Public Library
    ¤ ROCwiki



    Want to Advertise
    on RocSubway?
    Drop us a line.


    Other ways to follow RochesterSubway.com...

    Subscribe for Email Updates

    Email

    Become a Facebook Fan

    Facebook

    Follow Us on Twitter

    Twitter

    RSS Feed

    RSS

    Questions + Comments

    For questions about the Rochester Subway Poster or about your order, please email info@rochestersubway.com.

    Want to SAVE Shipping Costs?
    Buy our Subway Posters at these local shops...

    About the Rochester Subway Poster...

    ¤ Parkleigh [ ...map it ]
    ¤ Poster Art [ ...map it ]
    ¤ Rochester Public Library Store [ ...map it ]
    ¤ The Center at High Falls gift shop [ ...map it ]

    ¤ Rochester Subway Poster Press Release
    ¤ Article by Otto M. Vondrak
    ¤ Design by Mike Governale

    More About The Rochester Subway

    Help Support...

    ¤ Rochester Subway (Wikipedia)
    ¤ The End of the Line - Rochester's Subway, DVD
    ¤ Abandoned Subway Photos (Opacity.us)
    ¤ Walking the Rails (YouTube Video)

    Our Partners

    ¤ See a full listing of all Partners + Friends of RochesterSubway.com